World Events Can Have a Toll – Anxiety

Anxiety can be a one-off episode or can reoccur over many years in various ways, shapes or forms.  The causes of anxiety vary from individual to individual but often triggers can be shared by many members of our society.

One such trigger is traumatic community events. Recent events including the Coronavirus pandemic and the droughts in much of Australia and the bush fires in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia, have taken a huge psychological toll on many people.

The timing of the COVID-19 crisis found people alone and not able to spend time with their families over the Easter period like the used to. Likewise, fires around the Christmas and New Year holiday period meant that people were visiting places outside of their normal secure environment and may have felt especially vulnerable.  These people are also unlikely to be accustomed to bushfire activity and the ferocity of bushfires, coming from suburban areas that do not normally experience fire events. Both unfortunate circumstances can lead to overwhelming feelings of helplessness and anxiety.

Severe stress from a loved one getting sick or losing all your possessions can be enough to bring on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Seeing injured animals and other graphic scenes on TV or evening news will also impact the general public over time, even if it is not always immediately obvious.

Anxiety is a natural response to an overwhelmingly stressful situation, but bigger issues are caused when sufferers struggle to control their thoughts, ending up exhibiting in a range of physical symptoms, which can often be harmful.

Luckily, for sufferers there are a host of different treatments that can assist with managing such feelings to give patients back a sense of self control.

Having a supportive, holistic approach means that while triggers may present themselves from time to time, the physiological response to the stress can be better managed. Diet and exercise, along with medication have all been proven to reduce symptoms of anxiety.

One medicine which may have great benefit in reducing anxiety is cannabidiol or CBD, which is derived from the cannabis plant.  As expected, access to medicinal cannabis is highly regulated, with prescriptions being closely monitored and its prescription limited to expert practitioners.

Finding a doctor who truly understands your condition, as well as the best way to support your use of cannabinoid therapy is important. The team at Cannadoc Health are focused on working with all patients to achieve optimal therapy and long-term health outcomes.

Seasons will change and start to get better but being in control of anxiety and stressful feelings with the right medical care will give control and independence back to those in our society who struggle the most.

Get in touch today to learn how the team at Cannadoc can assist you on your road to recovery.

Cannadoc Health

www.cannadoc.com.au

1 300 944 033

Webinar Series: Maintaining Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19

So, we’re all locked down, socially isolated, and hopefully (if we’re lucky) working from home. We’re all anxious about our futures, and its uncertainty can be unnerving. Now what?

Well if you’re like most Australians, you’re probably feeling significant stress and worry. We have all seen in the media about how devastating this COVID-19 virus has been on the health and well-being of many thousands of people across Australia. And couple this with an economic downturn from the lock-down, the stress and worry will be amplified.

We all have friends and family who are likely to suffer from the devastating consequences of this pandemic, if not ourselves. What many people will forget to think about in such times of crisis is their own and their loved-one’s mental well-being.

Anxiety, depression, PTSD, and other mental health issues are common illnesses within our community, and these issues can be worsened in times of extreme stress. So, we all need to be mindful of how we’re feeling mentally on a day to day basis, as well as keep tabs on how our close family and friends are too.

Human beings are highly social creatures, so this period of isolation can be devastating to many members of our society. A big concern we have is that levels of anxiety, depression, and even suicide will rise dramatically over the coming weeks and months.

Therefore, we have decided to put together a Q&A webinar/forum for people to discuss their mental health issues and answer any questions you may have surrounding the maintenance of good mental health. Hopefully, we can offer people a ‘safe space’ to talk, to have high quality conversations about their mental health, and to discuss strategies on how they can improve their mental well-being.

This will be an informal open-access webinar series hosted by Cannadoc, led by a Melbourne based GP, Dr David Feng. We will be taking questions prior to the start of the webinar, so please email any questions/topics you want to discuss prior to the webinar, and we will try to get through as many as we can. We hope to see you then. Good luck, and stay safe.

Register here!

Maintaining Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19 | Cannadoc
Thu, 2 Apr 2020 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (AEDT)

Register here: https://cannadoc.com.au/webinar-registration/

You can also register by emailing: info@cannadoc.com.au

Cannadoc Health
www.cannadoc.com.au
info@cannadoc.com.au
1 300 944 033

Anxiety and Cannabidiol

Anxiety and fear are a normal, multi system adaptive response to a perceived threat or danger. However, excessive or persistent symptoms may lead to diminished quality of life, impairment to the social life and disability.

There is a variety of illnesses that can cause these symptoms such as, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Cannabinoids are substances derived from the cannabis plant and there is over 100 compounds that could be extracted for therapeutic benefit. The most used one for anxiety and fear is Cannabidiol (CBD) which is a non-psychoactive substance.

Another therapeutic substance of the cannabis plant is THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), which is beneficial for chronic pain and sleep, but it is also has the potential for euphoria and mind-altering effects if taken at high doses. It can also cause dry mouth, sleepiness and increased hunger.

Studies show that CBD eases anxiety by helping the body process serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter responsible for the feeling of well-being and vitality. This process occurs in a very similar way that of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), which are part of conventional therapy to treat anxiety and depression.

CBD has also the ability to counteract panic disorders by activating 5-HT1a receptors (which is a sub-type of serotonin receptor) in the brain. It can also interact with receptors in the amygdala, the primary part of the brain that processes sensory information and senses danger.

Therefore, CBD can have very good outcomes in the treatment of anxiety and depression. This type of treatment is extremely safe, it does not affect cognition, and does not have sedative effects.

CBD can also be used in other medical conditions due to its wide range of therapeutically properties, which includes potential as an anti-psychotic, analgesic, anti-seizure, anti-nausea, antioxidant, and even anti-inflammatory.

If you have any questions on anxiety and Cannabidiol (CBD) please don’t hesitate to contact Cannadoc on 1 300 944 033 or info@cannadoc.com.au. Our registered medical doctors will be more than happy to assist and discuss the legal medicinal cannabis access pathways.